Joint Society Letter Regarding MOC Certification

American College of Cardiology (05/28/19) Kovacs, Richard J.; Russo, Andrea M.; Mahmud, Ehtisham; et al.

In a joint letter, the American College of Cardiology, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Heart Failure Society of America, and American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) provide members with "information of interest regarding cardiologists' American Board of Internal Medicine certification status." Dec. 31, 2018 marked the end of the first five-year period for many diplomates to comply with revised ABIM maintenance of certification (MOC) requirements by earning 100 MOC points. Because the societies realized that many cardiologists who planned to remain certified were unaware of the new process and missed the Jan. 1, 2019, deadline, they urged ABIM's leaders to discuss opportunities for those diplomates to bring their certification into good standing. The authors recommend these diplomates first log into the ABIM website's Physician Portal to learn more about their MOC requirements. "If you are not certified because you need MOC points, you can become certified again almost immediately by completing the required number of outstanding points," they write. "ABIM's collaboration with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) provides the opportunity for ABIM Board Certified physicians to earn MOC points for thousands of accredited CME activities, including many offered by one of the cardiology societies." The authors also cite the availability of other opportunities to earn MOC points, some of which are offered at no charge. "If your hospital, payer, or employer credentialing committees have raised concerns, ABIM will work with you to provide a letter that can be shared with them outlining what you need to remedy any temporary loss of certification," the authors add.

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