AMA Delegates: Docs Must Lead Physician Training

MedPage Today (11/14/18) Frieden, Joyce

Members of the American Medical Association's (AMA) House of Delegates concurred at a recent interim meeting that physicians must exercise leadership in training medical students, residents, and fellows, while trainees should voice their concerns when this practice is not being followed. A resolution from the Michigan delegation was passed calling on the association to support the rights of medical students, residents, and fellows to be educated, supervised, and assessed by physicians, and that AMA "provide medical students, residents, and fellows a clear online resource outlining their rights ... to physician-led education and a means to report violations without fear of retaliation." Michigan alternate delegate Paul Bozyk, MD, said the resolution was proposed because the delegation "was hoping to inject language into policy that ensures the physician is part of the academic team for medical students and for residents, [although] not to the exclusion of other very valuable members of the multidisciplinary team."

However, the reference committee advised delegates to reaffirm existing policy stipulating that residents and fellows "should expect supervision by physicians and non-physicians who are adequately qualified and which allows them to assume progressive responsibility appropriate to their level of education, competence, and experience." Medical students are omitted from that policy. The panel also pushed for reaffirming the "teacher-learner" relationship, stating that medical education institutions should have a channel for complaints and an investigation procedure if expected standards of behavior, likely including retaliation against students who complain about being trained by non-physicians, are breached.

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